Pennsylvania Asbestos Reinsurance Dispute Stayed Under First Filed Rule

reinsurance

PHILADELPHIA, March 3 — A federal judge has granted a motion filed by R&Q Reinsurance Company to stay a reinsurance coverage suit filed by St. Paul Insurance arising out of more than $10 million in asbestos – related payments made by St. Paul on behalf of an insured.  St. Paul sought reimbursement  from R&Q pursuant to a reinsurance treaty with INA Reinsurance, to which R&Q has become a successor in interest.

The case  has now been stayed pending the outcome of a previous case filed by R&Q in United States District Court in Illinois in 2015. That case is captioned R&Q Reinsurance Company, f/k/a Ace American Reinsurance Company, f/k/a Cigna Reinsurance Company, f/k/a INA Reinsurance Company v. St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company (No. 15-cv-07784, U.S.  N.D. Ill.).

U.S. District Judge Judge Joel H. Slomsky originally denied the motion to stay in the Pennsylvania action  on Dec. 18, but vacated that ruling as part of a decision he rendered on a motion to dismiss subsequently filed by R&Q in Pennsylvania .  R&Q sought dismissal or stay in Pennsylvania  pursuant to the first filed rule, citing to the Illinois litigation filed in 2015.

St. Paul had already filed and fully briefed a motion to transfer venue in the Illinois proceeding.  Judge Slomsky stayed the Pa. proceeding pending rulingson jurisdictional motions in the Illinois action.

St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company v. R&Q Reinsurance Company, No. 15-cv-5528, E.D. Pa. March 3, 2016.

 

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Judge Rules DWI Victims Adequately State Bad Faith Claim Against Progressive

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 4 – U.S. District Judge Timothy J. Savage has denied a motion to dismiss filed by Progressive Insurance Company in response to a bad faith complaint filed by Progressive insureds Jeffrey and Aimee Kelly arising out of a UM/UIM claim.    The Court did dismiss, however, claims the Kellys made against progressive under the Pa. Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law.

The Kellys were injured in 2010 when their vehicle was struck from behind by a drunk driver.  They settled with the drunk driver for the driver’s policy limits, and then filed a UM/UIM claim with their own carrier, Progressive.  Progressive denied the claim, and the Kelly’s filed suit.

The Judge stated succinctly:

The Kellys allege that Progressive failed to pay their claims, make a reasonable settlement offer, investigate their claims properly, and consider medical and other documentation. These allegations suffice to state a claim under § 8371… The insurance bad faith statute applies to post-contract formation conduct. The UTPCPL, on the other hand, applies to conduct surrounding  the insurer’s pre-formation conduct.  The UTPCPL applies to the sale of an insurance policy.  It does not apply to the handling of insurance claims.

Kelly v. Progressive Advanced Ins. Co., (E.D. Pa. Feb. 4, 2016)(Savage, J.)

Breach of Contract, Bad Faith Cases Dismissed In Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH, Feb. 5 – Chief District Magistrate Judge Maureen Kelly has dismissed breach of contract and bad faith claims against State Farm by an insured contractor, finding that the underlying allegations of damage caused by the contractor fell outside of policy period.

Reginella Construction was insured under a contractor’s liability policy with State Farm between July 2004 and May 2006.  In 2013, a homeowner filed suit against Reginella complaining of problems with the floor, caused by poor materials and workmanship.  The homeowner subsequently won the underlying case against Reginella.  State Farm denied defense and indemnity to Reginella in February 2014, claiming that the occurrence per the suit against Reginella fell outside of the policy period(s).

After Reginella sued State Farm in Allegheny County, Pa. in 2015, State Farm removed the case to federal court and filed a motion to dismiss pursuant to F.R.C.P. 12(b)(6).

“Although the cause of the damages to the Eck home was arguably within the coverage period, ‘the cause of injury . . . has no special relevance to determining the date an insurance policy is triggered, unless specifically required by the language of the applicable policy of insurance.’ Where, as here, there is no policy language requiring the cause of injury to be identified, Pennsylvania courts apply the ‘first manifestation rule’ to occurrence policies; that is, the court looks to when injury is ‘reasonably apparent,’ i.e., when it is first manifested.”

Judge Kelly granted State Farm’s motion to dismiss, based on the first manifestation rule and the allegations of the underlying complaint against Reginella, the damage caused by Reginella’s conduct fell outside of the applicable policy period.

Because the Court found that State Farm’s coverage position was supported by a “plain reading” of the policy provisions, it dismissed bad faith claims against State Farm as well.

Reginella Construction Co., Inc. v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., (W.D. Pa. Feb 5. 2016)(Kelly, C.M.J.)

Dickie McCamey Lawyers Obtain Rescission of $25M Product Contamination Policy For Client In Coverage Dispute

PITTSBURGH, Feb. 1 – Dickie McCamey lawyers Robert Marino and Dave Ziegler along with lawyers from Choate, Hall & Steward have successfully obtained rescission of a $25 million dollar surplus Product Contamination Insurance (PCI) policy issued by Starr Surplus Lines Inc. Co . to H.J. Heinz.  The ruling  relieves the insurer of reimbursing Heinz for expenses arising out of the furnishing of lead-contaminated baby food.

Applying New York law, U.S. District Judge Arthur Schwab ruled earlier this week that the omission of multiple significant prior contamination claims from Heinz’ loss histories in the application for coverage was material, thereby entitling Starr to rescission of the policies.  Schwab found testimony from Starr’s underwriters and executives that the unreported losses were material to insuring Heinz’ risk credible.

The Court, with the consent of counsel, empaneled an advisory jury to assist with fact finding, and while it agreed with most of the jury’s findings,  it departed and disagreed with that portion of the advisory jury verdict which found that Heinz had adequately proved Starr had waived the right to assert Heinz’ material misrepresentations as to prior losses.  Schwab wrote:

While Starr was not “perfect” in its assessment and underwriting practices, perfection is not the standard.  Instead, this Court finds that Starr acted more than reasonably under the circumstances.  Specifically, the Court finds that Starr’s expert was credible, and that Starr’s underwriters lacked sufficient knowledge of Heinz’ misrepresentations or omissions.

The Court rejected Heinz’ claims that Starr engaged in post-claim underwriting, and that Starr should have conducted further investigation during the underwriting process about prior losses, including delving into information about Heinz’ prior losses from sources other than the application, including applications for other coverages, and prior news coverage of Heinz contamination claims.

While Schwab conceded the equitable remedy of rescission ab initio was an extreme one, he ruled that Starr met its burden of proving entitlement to the equitable remedy.  Dickie McCamey’s attorneys worked as co-counsel in the case with Attorneys Bob Frank, John Nadas, Matt Arnould and others at Choate Hall & Stewart in the representation of Starr.

H.J. Heinz Company v. Starr Surplus Lines Ins. Co., (W.D. Pa., Feb. 1, 2016)(Schwab, J.).

Editor’s Note:  Judge Schwab’s opinion makes it fairly clear that an insurer does not have a reasonable duty to either 1.) presume an applicant is omitting information; or 2. ) investigate items which do not appear on the application.

-UPDATE- Reconsideration Denied; Summary Judgment for Harleysville Upheld In Bad Faith Case

READING, Feb. 2 – The Berks County Court of Common Pleas has denied Plaintiff’s Motion for Reconsideration on the same day the motion was filed regarding the case discussed in this prior post.

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Reading, Pa., Jan. 19Dickie, McCamey & Chilcote attorneys C.J. Haddick and Christine Line have won a dismissal in a bad faith case in favor of client Harleysville Insurance Companies.  The Berks County, Pa.  Court of Common Pleas on January 19 granted the motion for summary judgment filed by Haddick and Line in a bad faith suit arising out of a commercial property coverage dispute over an alleged van theft and fire involving business personal property.  Haddick and Line are members of the firm’s Insurance Law and Litigation Group.

Harleysville did not dispute it owed coverage for the value of the van, substitute van rental expense, and for the value of certain business personal property under an inland marine policy.  It did contest, however, the Plaintiff’s claimed entitlement to a variety of other sums for towing, vehicle storage, loss of business income, and claims for tool losses in excess of the policy limit.  The Court agreed that the additional claims were unsupported by the policy language.

The Court also agreed with Harleysville’s position that regardless of the outcome of the several coverage claims, the claims decisions made were made with reasonable legal and factual bases.  As a result, the Plaintiff’s bad faith claims were dismissed as well.

For additional details on  the ruling, or suggestions  how to have your coverage and bad faith claims decided faster and more favorably with greater cost control, contact us at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800

Rogers Flooring Co. v. Harleysville Ins. Co., Berks County No. 14-674 (Sprecher, J.)

Zurich Asks 3rd Circuit To Reverse $1M UM/UIM Award

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 13.  Zurich American Insurance company has asked the U.S. Court of appeals  for the Third Circuit to reverse a lower court’s ruling ordering it to pay $1 million in uninsured motorist (UM) benefits, arguing that a sign down form setting UM limits at $35,oo0.00 was valid and enforceable.

Stefan Freeth alleged injury while working on a truck owned by roadway contractor Road-Con Inc.  He sought UM/UIM benefits under Road – Con’s commercial auto policy with Zurich, and was awarded $1 million in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pa., following Zurich’s removal of the case from the Chester County, Pa. Court of Common Pleas.

On appeal, Zurich contends that the sign down form completed by a company executive was a sufficient “express designation” within the meaning of the Pa. M.V.F.R.L.  to constitute a valid election of UM/UIM limits lower than the commercial auto policy’s bodily injury limits of $1 million dollars.  Freeth’s counsel claims the form is ambiguous, stating,  “there is no affirmative written election of the amount of $35,000.00 by Road-Con. There is no handwritten entry by the named insured or check mark or initialing of the amount of $35,000.00 on the Summary Form.”

Stefan Freeth v. Zurich American Insurance Co., No. 15-2924, (3rd Cir 2015)

Editor’s Note:  For copies of the briefing, email me at chaddick@dmclaw.com

Federal Judge Denies Stay, Upholds Insurer’s Work Product Privilege In Bad Faith Case

Reading, Pa., Jan. 19.  U.S. District Judge  Joseph Leeson  has denied a motion filed by Allstate Insurance Company to sever and  stay a  bad faith claim, including  discovery,  in a combined breach of contract and bad faith case, but has ordered that Allstate may properly assert work product privilege protection as to matters genuinely prepared in anticipation of litigation.

In Wagner v. Allstate, Judge Leeson conceded that while there may be a basis for separate trial of the breach of contract and bad faith claims under F.R.C.P. 42 , there was no need to prevent simultaneous discovery in both the breach of contract and bad faith claims.

Judge Leeson also granted in part and denied in part Plaintiff’s motion to compel discovery of Allstate’s claims file, ruling that the Court needed more information to make a complete ruling on the motion.  The Court ruled that Allstate did have the right to assert privilege over materials in its claims files which were prepared in anticipation of litigation, while observing the parties disputed the date at which time Allstate’s anticipation of litigation over the underlying UIM claim was bona fide.

Wagner v. Allstate Ins. Co., E.D. Pa. 2016 (Leeson, J.)