-UPDATE- Reconsideration Denied; Summary Judgment for Harleysville Upheld In Bad Faith Case

READING, Feb. 2 – The Berks County Court of Common Pleas has denied Plaintiff’s Motion for Reconsideration on the same day the motion was filed regarding the case discussed in this prior post.

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Reading, Pa., Jan. 19Dickie, McCamey & Chilcote attorneys C.J. Haddick and Christine Line have won a dismissal in a bad faith case in favor of client Harleysville Insurance Companies.  The Berks County, Pa.  Court of Common Pleas on January 19 granted the motion for summary judgment filed by Haddick and Line in a bad faith suit arising out of a commercial property coverage dispute over an alleged van theft and fire involving business personal property.  Haddick and Line are members of the firm’s Insurance Law and Litigation Group.

Harleysville did not dispute it owed coverage for the value of the van, substitute van rental expense, and for the value of certain business personal property under an inland marine policy.  It did contest, however, the Plaintiff’s claimed entitlement to a variety of other sums for towing, vehicle storage, loss of business income, and claims for tool losses in excess of the policy limit.  The Court agreed that the additional claims were unsupported by the policy language.

The Court also agreed with Harleysville’s position that regardless of the outcome of the several coverage claims, the claims decisions made were made with reasonable legal and factual bases.  As a result, the Plaintiff’s bad faith claims were dismissed as well.

For additional details on  the ruling, or suggestions  how to have your coverage and bad faith claims decided faster and more favorably with greater cost control, contact us at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800

Rogers Flooring Co. v. Harleysville Ins. Co., Berks County No. 14-674 (Sprecher, J.)

Zurich Asks 3rd Circuit To Reverse $1M UM/UIM Award

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 13.  Zurich American Insurance company has asked the U.S. Court of appeals  for the Third Circuit to reverse a lower court’s ruling ordering it to pay $1 million in uninsured motorist (UM) benefits, arguing that a sign down form setting UM limits at $35,oo0.00 was valid and enforceable.

Stefan Freeth alleged injury while working on a truck owned by roadway contractor Road-Con Inc.  He sought UM/UIM benefits under Road – Con’s commercial auto policy with Zurich, and was awarded $1 million in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pa., following Zurich’s removal of the case from the Chester County, Pa. Court of Common Pleas.

On appeal, Zurich contends that the sign down form completed by a company executive was a sufficient “express designation” within the meaning of the Pa. M.V.F.R.L.  to constitute a valid election of UM/UIM limits lower than the commercial auto policy’s bodily injury limits of $1 million dollars.  Freeth’s counsel claims the form is ambiguous, stating,  “there is no affirmative written election of the amount of $35,000.00 by Road-Con. There is no handwritten entry by the named insured or check mark or initialing of the amount of $35,000.00 on the Summary Form.”

Stefan Freeth v. Zurich American Insurance Co., No. 15-2924, (3rd Cir 2015)

Editor’s Note:  For copies of the briefing, email me at chaddick@dmclaw.com

Federal Judge Denies Stay, Upholds Insurer’s Work Product Privilege In Bad Faith Case

Reading, Pa., Jan. 19.  U.S. District Judge  Joseph Leeson  has denied a motion filed by Allstate Insurance Company to sever and  stay a  bad faith claim, including  discovery,  in a combined breach of contract and bad faith case, but has ordered that Allstate may properly assert work product privilege protection as to matters genuinely prepared in anticipation of litigation.

In Wagner v. Allstate, Judge Leeson conceded that while there may be a basis for separate trial of the breach of contract and bad faith claims under F.R.C.P. 42 , there was no need to prevent simultaneous discovery in both the breach of contract and bad faith claims.

Judge Leeson also granted in part and denied in part Plaintiff’s motion to compel discovery of Allstate’s claims file, ruling that the Court needed more information to make a complete ruling on the motion.  The Court ruled that Allstate did have the right to assert privilege over materials in its claims files which were prepared in anticipation of litigation, while observing the parties disputed the date at which time Allstate’s anticipation of litigation over the underlying UIM claim was bona fide.

Wagner v. Allstate Ins. Co., E.D. Pa. 2016 (Leeson, J.)

Phila. Judge Recommends Bad Faith Dismissal

Philadelphia, Jan. 20.  A Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge has recommended that the Pa. Superior Court affirm her dismissal of breach of contract and bad faith claims filed against Progressive Insurance Company.   In an opinion written pursuant to Pa.R.A.P. 1925(a) in Racioppi v. Progressive Ins. Co.,2015 Phila. Ct. Com. Pl. LEXIS 415 , the Court dismissed the Plaintiff’s claims for UM benefits under her Progressive auto policy following an automobile accident.  The Plaintiff  had previously collected policy limits of the tortfeasor, Insured by Geico.

The Court held that both the breach of contract and bad faith counts suffered from the same fatal defect:  The Plaintiff failed to proved that she paid for a policy which was in force at the time of the collision.  While the Court conceded there were circumstances in which a bad faith claim could proceed in the absence of a breach of contract claim, it found that such circumstances were not presented by the Plaintiff’s UM claim at issue:

Since the breach of contract claim is without evidence, this component of the bad faith claim must immediately be rejected; Appellee-Defendants cannot have failed to pay in reckless disregard of the contract when Appellant-Plaintiff fails to offer any evidence that there was a contract between the parties on the date of the accident.

The Court dismissed the claims by way of a motion for summary judgment filed by Progressive.

Racioppi v. Progressive Ins. Co., 2015 Phila. Ct. Com. Pl. LEXIS 415 (Shreeves-Johns, J.)

DMC Lawyers Obtain Summary Judgment For Harleysville In Bad Faith Suit

Reading, Pa., Jan. 19Dickie, McCamey & Chilcote attorneys C.J. Haddick and Christine Line have won a dismissal in a bad faith case in favor of client Harleysville Insurance Companies.  The Berks County, Pa.  Court of Common Pleas on January 19 granted the motion for summary judgment filed by Haddick and Line in a bad faith suit arising out of a commercial property coverage dispute over an alleged van theft and fire involving business personal property.  Haddick and Line are members of the firm’s Insurance Law and Litigation Group.

Harleysville did not dispute it owed coverage for the value of the van, substitute van rental expense, and for the value of certain business personal property under an inland marine policy.  It did contest, however, the Plaintiff’s claimed entitlement to a variety of other sums for towing, vehicle storage, loss of business income, and claims for tool losses in excess of the policy limit.  The Court agreed that the additional claims were unsupported by the policy language.

The Court also agreed with Harleysville’s position that regardless of the outcome of the several coverage claims, the claims decisions made were made with reasonable legal and factual bases.  As a result, the Plaintiff’s bad faith claims were dismissed as well.

For additional details on  the ruling, or suggestions  how to have your coverage and bad faith claims decided faster and more favorably with greater cost control, contact us at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800

Rogers Flooring Co. v. Harleysville Ins. Co., Berks County No. 14-674 (Sprecher, J.)