Alternative Fee Program Data Shows As Program Matures, Clients Realize Savings On Outside Legal Expense

efficiency

Here is an actual set of alternative fee numbers I’ve just happily provided to update one of the insurance clients I represent, demonstrating that an alternative fee program is saving them money on outside legal expense.  Real money.

Listed below are data for seven insurance related  cases I am handling under a monthly flat fee program (with a cap on the number of months the flat fee can be charged, so as to encourage efficiency).  First a look at the numbers, and then a few quick observations.   Only the case names below are changed to protect identities.  The numbers are 100% actual  and show actual flat fees paid by the client versus what they would have paid under an hourly rate agreement.  Green numbers in the Net Diff. column represent savings to the client.

Case            Hourly Fees      Flat Fees       Net Diff.

Smith        $17,218.50       $25,350.00       $8,131.50

Jones         $30,433.00        $13,650.00     -$16,783.00

Ajax           $2,212.50         $2,775.00         $562.50

King          $4,781.00          $1,950.00       -$2,831.00

Queen       $2,157.50         $895.00            -$1,262.50

Western   $4,074.50         $2,925.00         -$1,149.50

Atlantic   $351.00            $2,775.00        $2,424.00

Total         $61,228.00     $50,320.00     -$10,908.00

Client Savings:            -17.8%

Before the observations, a caveat:  This data, at any given time, is a snapshot in the life of an assignment, and/or group of assignments.  The data changes, but as the assignments mature in terms of their life cycle, a clear picture emerges:

  • Overall the client savings in this alternative fee program approaches 20%.  As the data set increases, the savings  ratio will stay relatively stable, but the real dollars saved in outside legal expense will grow, and grow, and grow.  A company with a million dollars a year  in outside legal expense based on hourly engagements would spend only $821,846.21, a savings of nearly $200,000.00.
  • The insurance clients are “winning” more fee agreements than they are not “winning.”  This is a sign that the alternative fee program is rightly priced so that it is both 1.) an real financial benefit for the client, and 2.) not a financial hardship for the outside law firm.
  • The program retains extreme flexibility, as each assignment is quoted independently (although the quotes generally do cluster closely for similar type cases) and either side retains the right to seek adjustment as the matter proceeds.  Clients also reserve the right to request the traditional billable hour arrangement for any case which they feel does not suit the alternative fee program.
  • There are and there will be outliers in any alternative fee program.  But as you can see from the data, the outliers are rare — in the two cases with  more than a $5,000.00 difference between what the client paid and what the client would have paid, one benefitted the client, and one benefitted the law firm, but the client benefitted twice as much as the law firm when the two outliers are aggregated.  Win-win-win.
  • The program provides simultaneous double benefit to the participating client:  1.) the client gets the benefit of outside counsel with local knowledge and expertise;  and 2.) the client secures this quality at less than hourly rate pricing.

I cannot think of any CEO’s, CFO’s or any other XXO’s who would not like their General Counsel to approach them with an immediate simple way to give their outside legal expense a 20% haircut, while at the same time retaining the right to assign any matter under a flat fee or traditional billable hour arrangement.

I also cannot think of a General Counsel for whom I have ever worked who would not want to take the alternative fee arrangement mechanism I’ve  outlined above for a spin, if it meant retaining the desired law firm at reduced cost.  There is literally nothing to lose except 20% off your outside legal expense budget.

CJH

 

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Re-Purposing The Free Initial Consultation For The Benefit of Insurers and Corporate Clients

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Alternative fee arrangements are out of the bag by now.  They are being tried and used by insurers as part of ongoing efforts to bring cost-certainty to outside legal fees.  Badfaithadvisor.com has a complete survey of alternative fee options here.

But that is not the end of the leverage in favor of  insurers and corporate clients.  And to that end,  I am going to let you all in on a very big secret.  Not only that, I am going to invite — no — I’m going to dare, you to take advantage of it, and here it is:   I would rather my clients and prospects talk to me for free about matters of concern to them ,  than to let them  talk to any of my competitors.  Under any terms.

And so, the free initial consultation, long a staple of the plaintiff’s bar, has been co-opted and re-purposed for my insurance company and other corporate clients.

Insurance and corporate clients, and prospective clients who are interested in testing the waters, are given  free initial consultations of anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours (and sometimes more)  to review documents, and to discuss cases they are considering assigning to outside counsel.  But I offer the same thing to the same clients and the same prospects who are actually looking to AVOID sending a matter to outside counsel, too.  This provides value to them in the form of an informal first or second opinion which will give them early clarity on a matter, and peace of mind on potential action plans for handling those claims or matters.

The free initial document review / consultation is a win – win for clients and prospects.  If they do decide to retain me, on either en alternative or conventional fee basis, they have familiarized me with the matter they will be assigning and brought me up to speed at no cost to them, thereby reducing their overall legal expense on the matter.   If they decide to keep the matter in-house, they have received the value of an outside look for free, and I have hopefully created good will my clients will remember when the next matter comes up for consideration.

There are and will always be major coverage matters and bet-the-company litigation which insurers and corporate clients on which clients will seek outside representation.  Free initial consultations on both these matters and matters which clients never assign to outside counsel is another way to provide value to clients in business environments encouraging the limitation and reduction of outside legal expense.

C.J. Haddick

In-House Legal Departments / Outside Counsel – New Year’s Resolutions

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As I look back over a year’s worth of posts, I can see that efficiency and cost certainty in the use of outside counsel by insurers is a common theme.  2017, I predict, will bring more of the same for insurance companies and their in house legal departments:  an institutional imperative to control costs and to gain cost certainty, in the matters they refer to outside law firms.  With that in mind, we take a quick look at some new year’s resolutions, and see whether there is any way to line up the resolutions of in house legal departments and outside law firms.

Resolution:  Know The Alternative Fee Options

The duty of outside firms to offer, and in house legal departments to utilize, alternative fee arrangements to continue efficiency in operations requires familiarity by both sides with the large variety of alternative fee tools available.  A complete review of some of the most common options appears on this resource page.

Alternative fee options are the language of efficiency in the engagement outside law firms, the coin of the realm for lean and effective operation in the years ahead.  It pays both insurers and outside law firms to be conversant in this language, and to communicate with each other in this language.

Resolution: Utilize Legal Project Management (LPM)

There has traditionally been an inverse relationship between insurers’ in house counsel affinity for LPM, and outside law firms’ competence and ability to provide it.  As insurers resolve again to control cost with effective LPM in 2017, competitive and responsive outside law firms must learn to use LPM effectively.  This requires repetitive use of LPM and case budgeting, and refining the process with each successive use.  It requires the reasonable cost projection of a legal matter, so the client can make informed decisions.

LPM projection and budgeting enable in house legal departments to make strategic decisions about which matters to fight, and which matters to resolve, and more importantly, when to do so.  LPM provides in house legal departments with important dashboard items, and they will increasingly expect outside law firms to provide these services as part of working for the insurer in 2017 and beyond.

Resolution:  Big Data Feedback

In a closely related resolution, in house legal departments at insurance companies will continue to expect more and useful data from outside law firms as to the value provided and the relationship of that value to the amount and type of the legal services billed.  Outside law firms must therefore continue to develop metrics tailored to each individual client to provide the client the data it needs and wants to make assessments as to whether matters are run efficiently, and outside law firms are providing value.

Outside firms which do not keep pace with the need to collect and feed back big data to clients on these issues will continue to lag in 2017 and beyond, and the pressure to keep up by providing requested data, and interpretation will be on the rise.

Resolution:  Cooperation and Collaboration, Not Conflict and Contention

The legal landscape is a challenging one now, and it is likely to continue to be so.  Outside law firms comfortable with the traditional hourly arrangement are oftentimes slow to modernize, and this failure creates a tension between a client and their outside lawyers on whether the fit is right, and whether the billable hour is in the best interests of the client.

Outside law firms must overcome such tension, and begin to view themselves as collaborators and business partners of the insurance in house legal departments they represent.  Alternative Fee Arrangements, LPM, and the aggregation and use of data to feedback to the clients are three primary vehicles for such positive change in 2017, and going forward .

 

Adapt or Die

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In yesterday’s edition of Law360.com, former McKesson in house lawyer Jill Dessalines wrote an excellent piece on the Corporate Demand for Value from outside law firms.  In the article, entitled, “Adapt Or Die: Law Firms In Tomorrow’s Economy,” Dessalines says that while the billable hour is still here, “it is gasping for breath and failing fast.”

Dessalines writes about the truth many old-line outside firms try to ignore about the billable hour:

“The problem is not just that it encourages inefficiency — like paying a kid to pull weeds in your yard by the hour rather than by the job. The problem is not just that it rewards quantity over quality. No, the essential problem… is that it is disconnected from the value of services rendered. For the corporate client, who by definition measures success and failure based on the value delivered to its bottom line, this disconnect is unfathomable.

Unfathomable.  That is pretty strong language from a lawyer who has had to purchase the services of outside firms and at the same time  remain accountable to her corporate client.  Unfathomable.  For outside firms to ignore that disconnect any longer is to ignore the need to adapt or die.

Dessalines points out that historically, the billable hour was a function of recapturing an outside firms overhead plus a profit.  But the market now recognizes that the costs of services as determined by the seller is a proposition completely divorced from the value of services as perceived by the buyer.  And the latter is the only thing the buyer really cares about in the end.

Dessalines writes:

“Why should a client pay for a firm’s marketing costs, or phone bill or taste in art, or for any overhead cost? What correlation is there between the firm’s overhead and the value of the services delivered? There is none. And corporate clients know it.”

Alternative fee arrangements, and sophisticated means of measuring value are now commonplace.  To compete, outside law firms must offer value and predictability to their corporate clients, including insurance companies, which remain a major purchaser of outside legal services.  Value pricing, Dessalines observes, is gaining traction.  And in the face of the economic realities of today’s legal marketplace, how could it not be?

A new economic model for the pricing and delivery of legal services requires alternative fee arrangements.  Reach me for more information on how to deliver or purchase outside legal services more efficiently.

Dollarize The Benefit Of Alternative Fee Arrangements For Clients

economics

In house legal departments are all under the imperative to spend legal expense dollars more efficiently.  At the same time, they may also be wary of trying new fee arrangements with outside firms, unsure of whether or not they will “win” the gamble.  It does not, however, have to be a gamble at all.

Good outside law firms should be feeding back data to their clients on how alternative fee arrangement’s are working.  Where positive, this feedback will only encourage the client to put the arrangement into wider usage.  Where negative, it should be the basis of renegotiation for the benefit of the client, to arrive at an arrangement which does what the outside law firm promised to do:  reduce legal expense.

Here is an excerpt from a recent feedback report sent to a client on how a monthly flat fee subscription arrangement was working out for them.  It is a report in-house departments would all like to see, and should be demanding from their outside lawyers:

Dear _______ and ________, 

I thought you might like an update on how you were doing by using the monthly flat fee subscription arrangement  we piloted on some new assignments you have made.  I hope you will be pleased with the results: 

Case           Hourly                Flat                     Savings

A                 $4,621.00          $3,900.00         $821.00

B                  $5,587.00         $2,925.00          $2,662.00

C                  $2,554.00         $2,985.00         -$431.00

D                  $3,926.50         $2,925.00           $371.50

 

TOTAL       $16,058.50        $12,635.000       $3,423.50

SAVINGS         21.32%

What jumps out at me  is not so much the savings — although that is a good thing — but the leverage the arrangement could provide when scaled up.  In other words, the wider you put the fee arrangement into usage, the more money you are likely to save in legal expense, which is one of the key imperatives of claims and legal departments in this day and age.  Hypothetically, if this arrangement were applied to $200,000.00 in legal expense under the traditional hourly arrangement, you would cut this expense to $160,000.00, a savings of $40,000.00.

We wanted to make sure you knew that we were not merely making promises on the fee arrangements upon which we could not deliver.  It appears the arrangement is saving your department money, which is what any good outside law firm should be trying to do for you in this highly competitive environment.

We hope you are pleased, and we are happy to put the arrangement to wider use whenever you believe it is wise to do so.

 Thanks, as always, for your business. 

CJ

Share the news, good or bad, with in-house legal departments to help them to the job they have been charged to do:  handle the company’s legal matter faster, better, and more efficiently.  It can only help.

Alternative Fees Case Study: Flat Monthly Subscription Fee Arrangement’s First Birthday Party

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Innovation is worrisome to outside law firms.  In most cases, at best it is given passing lip service as part of the DNA of any law firm attempting to keep pace with the changing market of working for in house legal departments.  At worst, innovation is the object of secret fear and loathing.  The billable hour is comfortable, predictable, measureable.  The problem is,  your clients don’t care about that.  You are in business for them, not the other way around.

But to all of those in secret fear of innovation and giving alternative fee arrangements a try, take heart, and be not afraid, for I bring good news.  In actual, real-life practice, the flat monthly subscription alternative fee arrangement works, and is popular with in house legal departments looking for greater cost control over outside legal fees.

In the past year a large, multi-state errors and omissions insurer was looking to its outside counsel to offer alternative fee options.  I matched them up with the monthly flat fee subscription arrangement with limits on the duration of the subscription for the matters they assigned us.  At the time we were doing work for this legal department in only one state – Pennsylvania.

The mechanics are straight forward – I conduct a brief review of every new assignment to get a sense for the size and probable case duration, and then provide the in house legal department with a quote for handling the case, expressed in a set payment per month with a maximum duration of months.  Each side can request to renegotiate the case duration if there are major changes in case complexion during the life of the case.  Trial prep, trial, and appeal are separately negotiated if necessary on either an hourly fee or flat fee per day basis with parameters on the number of agreed upon days, at the option of the client .

We are now a year into the program, and  we are now working for this insurer in five states, not one.  They have fed back to us the following about the program:

  • the primary benefit to this insurer’s claims operation is the injection of some cost – certainly into an inherently cost-uncertain endeavor — litigation;
  • cost-efficiency of the subscription arrangement grows with the number of assignments made on that basis;
  • they like the billable hour comparison data we provide so they can compare the relative cost, and benefits received, by the monthly subscription arrangement;
  • they enjoy the ability to adjust the subscription duration should new developments in the case, changes in parties, etc., take place during the life of the case; and
  • they appreciate the fact that we often “no charge” them for any months in which no substantial work takes place due to factors beyond our control, and they are willing to extend the subscription duration for a corresponding length in exchange.

Innovation in outside law firms can be taken beyond merely lip service.  It can be put into practice when it comes to alternative fees, and it can be successful for both the lawyer and the client.

For more information on how to deliver efficient, and cost-effective service to  your in house legal department through the use of flat monthly subscription and other alternative fee arrangements, reach  me at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800.

The Economics of Loyalty: Why In-House Legal Departments Can’t Afford To Be Nice All The Time

economics

I turned 51 today.  So I consider myself  a Tweener when it comes to the practice of law:  I am not so old yet to be considered one of the Old Guard Traditionalists, but I am too old to be considered New Blood.  This  gives me a unique perspective of both traditional thinking  about the relationships between law firms and in-house legal departments, and the new reality which doesn’t seem as friendly as collegial as the Old Guard Traditionalists remember it.

I confess I lean a little toward the Old Guard Traditionalists, because I can recall a time when in house legal departments for insurance companies and corporate clients, after a law firm delivered them a defense verdict or a well below case authority settlement, would complain that the bills were not sufficiently large in comparison to the result which was obtained.   Admittedly, this is a distant memory, but it is a memory just the same.

But because I  know and recognize this as a distant memory, I recognize the current reality younger lawyers in outside firms face in working for in house legal departments, and in desperately try to retain work from those departments, and to keep those departments satisfied.

It can become circular discussion.  The Old Guard Traditionalists in  outside firms bemoan the lack of loyalty from clients, some of them previously long-standing ones.  For their part, the in house legal departments bemoan the lack of efficiency and responsiveness of their roster of outside law firms in a patently changing marketplace.  The New Blood wonders which came first in this dialogue, the chicken or the egg?

My perspective as a Tweener is that the latter question doesn’t matter, and the former confidence of the Old Guard Traditionalists in the virtue of their position  about the decline in client loyalty is just as irrelevant.

Which comes first, the chicken or the egg?  The Client.

In house legal departments have always had purchasing power.  They have in the distant past simply not used this lever, a lever they have had all along.  They could afford the luxury of loyalty.  Today, however, in the pressure of the marketplace from both without and within, General Counsel’s offices simply cannot afford to ignore efficiency, responsiveness, and cost – effectiveness.

They will always like you if you have had a good relationship with them.  That is not the question any longer.  The question is can they afford to do business with you?  Do you provide them value over and above the value they give to you in the form of fees?  Are you responsive to requests for alternative fee arrangements, volume discounts, and adherence to budgets and litigation management plans?  Do you give them a straight line plan to their result, or are you simply going to follow a litigation script by rote?

I have spent more than 25 years in an outside law firm, so what I am about to say is at most an educated guess.  I would wager that if in house legal departments could , they would simply operate on the principle of loyalty also.  After all, it is easier for them too, to work with lawyers they have used for a long time, and whom they like.  But they can no longer afford to measure suitability and to  do things that way, and neither can the outside law firms who work for them.  Efficiency and value must be delivered.  Those benchmarks will be rewarded with client loyalty.  Length of service is no longer the metric.

Those are the Economics of Loyalty in today’s legal marketplace.

For more information on how to deliver efficient, and cost-effective service to  your in house legal department, reach  me at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800.