Disagreement Over ACV Estimate Insufficient To Support Bad Faith Claim, Judge Rules

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PITTSBURGH, March 2  —  An ACV basis estimate upon which a homeowners’ claims offer was made by State Farm Insurance  did not lack a reasonable basis, a federal judge ruled in dismissing the homeowners bad faith claim.  In Randy Gowton v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., U.S. District Judge Cathy Bissoon dismissed Gowton’s bad faith claim against State Farm, finding that the  insured  failed to show that his insurer’s offer to settle “was not supported by a thorough and even-handed investigation.”

Gowton sustained damage to his home in a fire, and submitted an estimate from his contractor to State Farm for a replacement cost benefit of $293,911.80.  After performing its own inspection, State Farm offered just $112,694.50, based on a replacement cost estimate of $187,874.50, less  depreciation of $75,180.15.  Gowton’s policy was payable on an “actual cash value benefits” basis.

Gowton sued State Farm in the Fayette County Court of Common Pleas, and after removing the case to federal court, State Farm moved to dismiss the bad faith count.  A breach of contract count had previously been dismissed by Judge Bissoon on statute of limitations grounds.

Judge Bissoon held that mere disagreement on the value of a claim following a reasonable investigation could not support a claim for bad faith:

“Gowton has failed to allege any facts to suggest that State Farm’s settlement offer lacked a reasonable basis or was not supported by a thorough and even-handed investigation… Significantly, Gowton’s response brief reiterates that he is not alleging that State Farm was dilatory, failed to communicate, performed an unsatisfactory or biased investigation or unreasonably delayed in considering his claim.  Rather, Gowton simply alleges that State Farm’s estimate was per se unreasonable for no other reason than that it differed from his own.. In the absence of any supporting facts from which it might be inferred that the company’s investigation was biased or unreasonable, this type of disagreement in an insurance case is ‘not unusual,’ and ‘cannot, without more, amount to bad faith.”

“This conclusion is bolstered by an examination of the exhibits referenced throughout Gowton’s Amended Complaint.  State Farm performed an initial inspection of the property only two days after the damage occurred and provided a detailed, 38-page estimate within a month thereafter.  State Farm’s estimate contains a room-by-room assessment of the damage; detailed measurements; design drawings; materials analysis; and line by line estimates of the cost and depreciation of the construction materials necessary to rebuild the home.  This is precisely the type of thorough and adequate investigation that vitiates a claim of bad faith.”

Randy Gowton v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., et al., No. 15-1164, W.D. Pa., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 29390 (Bissoon, J.)

Breach of Contract, Bad Faith Cases Dismissed In Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH, Feb. 5 – Chief District Magistrate Judge Maureen Kelly has dismissed breach of contract and bad faith claims against State Farm by an insured contractor, finding that the underlying allegations of damage caused by the contractor fell outside of policy period.

Reginella Construction was insured under a contractor’s liability policy with State Farm between July 2004 and May 2006.  In 2013, a homeowner filed suit against Reginella complaining of problems with the floor, caused by poor materials and workmanship.  The homeowner subsequently won the underlying case against Reginella.  State Farm denied defense and indemnity to Reginella in February 2014, claiming that the occurrence per the suit against Reginella fell outside of the policy period(s).

After Reginella sued State Farm in Allegheny County, Pa. in 2015, State Farm removed the case to federal court and filed a motion to dismiss pursuant to F.R.C.P. 12(b)(6).

“Although the cause of the damages to the Eck home was arguably within the coverage period, ‘the cause of injury . . . has no special relevance to determining the date an insurance policy is triggered, unless specifically required by the language of the applicable policy of insurance.’ Where, as here, there is no policy language requiring the cause of injury to be identified, Pennsylvania courts apply the ‘first manifestation rule’ to occurrence policies; that is, the court looks to when injury is ‘reasonably apparent,’ i.e., when it is first manifested.”

Judge Kelly granted State Farm’s motion to dismiss, based on the first manifestation rule and the allegations of the underlying complaint against Reginella, the damage caused by Reginella’s conduct fell outside of the applicable policy period.

Because the Court found that State Farm’s coverage position was supported by a “plain reading” of the policy provisions, it dismissed bad faith claims against State Farm as well.

Reginella Construction Co., Inc. v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Co., (W.D. Pa. Feb 5. 2016)(Kelly, C.M.J.)