Defeating The Third Party Time Limit Settlement Demand

istock_000016351137xsmall-2

It’s the most common arrow in the quiver of plainfiffs’ lawyers when it comes to dealing with insurance companies:  the time limit settlement demand.  It’s used as a multi-purpose tool  against insurers to 1.) force an early settlement of the underlying third party  claim; 2.) prevent the insurer from conducting a full investigation into the underlying claim; 3.) drive a wedge between the insurer and its insured; and 4.) set up assignment of a follow-on bad faith claim in the event of an excess verdict in the third party claim.

Here’s how insurers can successfully defend against this tactic every time:

Document Receiving The Demand, And Immediately Request An Extension To Respond

This seems a rather obvious suggestion, but in practice it is overlooked as many times as utilized,  in my experience.   The failure to document receipt of the time limit settlement demand will not be of any help, and it exposes the insurer to the allegation of sloppy claims handling and inattentiveness to the claim.   If it arrives, when it arrives, acknowledge it in writing to the Plaintiff’s lawyer.

Especially when the time limits demand arrives early in the claims investigation, a written request for extension to respond to the demand should be made in writing immediately.  And of course, any refusal by plaintiff’s counsel to agree to the extension should be documented as well.

Document The Investigation Which Must Be Done Before Responding

While not strictly necessary, it is extremely helpful to identify with as much specificity as possible  the nature and extent of investigation you would like additional time to complete.    Providing these specifics will prevent any claim that the insurer is merely requesting additional time to delay paying the claim.

Obviously, the proposed investigation steps should be followed, and the results documented in the claims file.  Requesting an extension to investigate the claim and then failing to do the investigation exposes an insurer to bad faith exposure for  unreasonable delay.

Document Any Attempts By The Plaintiff’s Lawyer To Delay or Obstruct The Investigation

It happens.  Some zealous advocates are not content with merely refusing a request for an extension; in order to manufacture insurer delay the insurer will find that it is unable to get medical authorizations promptly, or unable to schedule the claimant’s examination under oath, to name two.  It is important that the claims file document accurately document responsibility for delay, or for expiration of the time limit demand, especially if the plaintiff’s lawyer is being either not helpful or worse, obstructing the investigation.

Keep The Insured Apprised, And Document That

In order to discharge the fiduciary duty an insurer owes to its insured in defending him or her in a third partly claim, the insured must be included and involved in communications involving the claim.  This is especially true where the insurer refuses to settle the underlying claim within policy limits, theoretically exposing the insured to an excess judgment.

An insurer does not have an obligation to settle non-meritorious or questionable claims within the insured’s policy limits.  However, if the insurer decides not to respond to a time limit demand, or refuses to settle a claim,  that should be communicated to the insured in advance of the time limit demand deadline, and the specific reasons for the insurer’s course should be provided to the insured.

Dual Benefits

All of the above steps will not only be of use in defending a follow – on bad faith claim should it come down the road, but it will lead to better results, and allow for proper investigation, of the underlying third party claim.  For more information on how to effectively rebut and defend against third party time limit settlement demands, reach me at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800.

Insured’s Failure To Cooperate During Time Limit Demand Leads To Bad Faith Dismissal

Florida, Jan. 19.  A Federal District Judge in Florida has granted summary judgment in favor of Titan Insurance Co. in a bad faith case, finding that the insured’s lack of responsiveness during a time limits settlement demand precluded the case from proceeding further.

In Hinson v. Titan Ins. Co., 2015 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 121666 (N.D. Fla. 2015), Chief Judge M. Casey Rodgers dismissed a third party bad faith suit arising out of an excess verdict against Titan’s insured, Hinson.  During an underlying personal injury case against Hinson, the plaintiff’s lawyer issued a 20 day settlement demand for policy limits, requiring among other things an affidavit from Hinson as to any other applicable insurance.

Titan’s claims personnel made multiple attempts to alert Hinson, including the hand delivery of a draft affidavit to his address, in an effort to comply with the terms of the time limits demand.  Chief Judge Rodgers wrote:

Hinson failed to timely return the required affidavit to meet the [terms of the time limit] demand…The totality of the circumstances demonstrate that Titan diligently pursued a settlement; advised Hinson of the risks of an excess judgment, of settlement opportunities, and the probable outcome of the litigation; and tendered checks on more than one occasion.

Hinson at 15-16.

The Court found that the failure to meet the conditions of the 20 day time limit demand were therefore attributable to the insured, not Titan, and entered judgment for Titan.

The Court also found that Titan’s refusal to agree to try the bad faith claim before the personal injury action and pay the limits to the personal injury plaintiff  if the insurer prevailed in the bad faith case (known in Florida as a “Cunningham agreement”) was not bad faith as a matter of law.

Takeaway:  There is nothing new under the sun here, although the case is a perfect illustration of two key components of dealing with time limit personal injury settlement demands: 1.) claims staff must make Herculean efforts to act  on the insured’s behalf within the demand window, and before it is too late; and 2.) those efforts must be re-traceable in a well-d0cumented claims file.  For additional information on defensive handling of time limit settlement demands, reach me at chaddick@dmclaw.com or 717-731-4800.

Hinson v. Titan Ins. Co., 2015 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 121666 (N.D. Fla. 2015),